The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 6

“Were You Fired?”

Before you read on, remember that these questions are not provided for you to merely skim over. The planning and preparation of answers is essential to maximizing your interviewing prowess. The only way to succeed is to match your background to a positive, upbeat, convincing answer for each of these questions. Start with your resume, know every word on it. Another key part of your preparation is company research. You should know as much about the company as you possibly can before you arrive for the interview.

No matter what your circumstance, you were never fired. Rather, you were “part of a downsizing and reorganization.” Always blame your condition on the economy or on organizational restructuring not on the company or on your former boss. Similarly, you were never laid off or cut loose nor did you “hit the bricks.”

You are answering the question in an appropriate manner yet not doing yourself damage. In the Total System we demonstrate the importance and method of rebuilding relationships. This is part of the process of obtaining references, even when the working relationship had been strained.

The focus from your position is that you are prepared to move forward, no negativity, only positive. You are the consummate professional ready bring your talents, skills and abilities to the next level. You are a future A+ member of the team that will help to advance this company to future success.

To achieve a better job for better pay and have a better life, commit to excellence.

-Charles

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 7, “Why are you leaving your current job?”

P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 5

“Would You Relocate (or Travel)?”

Before you read on, remember that these questions are not provided for you to merely skim over. The planning and preparation of answers is essential to maximizing your interviewing prowess. The only way to succeed is to match your background to a positive, upbeat, convincing answer for each of these questions. Start with your resume, know every word on it. Another key part of your preparation is company research. You should know as much about the company as you possibly can before you arrive for the interview.

This is an easy one. Your answer is, “Certainly, for the right opportunity.” There may be only one set of circumstances for which you would relocate – Cancun for $500,000 annually (or whatever your dream spot might be) – but your answer stands as accurate. If the company makes the right offer – the right opportunity – you’ll relocate. It’s truthful, but it keeps control of the interview in your court.

Be aware, also, of the motivation for companies to ask questions about relocation and travel. The information may have nothing to do with the position for which you’re interviewing, but frequently such queries originate from a list of prescribed questions to which every new employee must respond. How sad it would be if you lost a job offer because of a careless remark about not being willing to relocate, when in fact the job in question wouldn’t require a move.

Of course, if you have decided you definitely will not relocate or travel, then give this answer, realizing it may preclude you from further consideration. However, if you definitely would not relocate or travel, then you are protecting yourself from a hazardous situation a few months down the road when you are with the new company.

You are a professional who responds in a professional manner.  Always value and demonstrate honesty and integrity. When you tell the truth you never have to remember what you said and it may very well be something others will find worth remembering. Never lower your expectation and never demonstrate anything but integrity, clarity and professional attitude. To achieve a better job for better pay and have a better life, commit to excellence.

-Charles

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 6, “Were You Fired?”

P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 4

“What Stresses You?”

Before you read on, remember that these questions are not provided for you to merely skim over. The planning and preparation of answers is essential to maximizing your interviewing prowess. The only way to succeed is to match your background to a positive, upbeat, convincing answer for each of these questions. Start with your resume, know every word on it. Another key part of your preparation is company research. You should know as much about the company as you possibly can before you arrive for the interview.

Stress is a common issue in the work place. One thing that stresses one person may energize another! Think carefully on a positive response to this question. For instance, you might say, “I am careful to manage my stress so it does not affect my productivity or others around me. One thing that does tend to stress me is people who don’t pull their weight, who won’t strive for excellence. That may sound like I’m intolerant, but I try to give people every benefit of the doubt and communicate my concerns to them as appropriate.”

Carefully note this answer. Not only does it defuse a potentially dangerous area of questioning, but it also illustrates our positioning theory. Tolerance might be a concern of the interviewer, and if it is not addressed, it might become a negative. However, when you link it to the answer, you’ve controlled the interview in a professional manner while simultaneously heading off a potential concern.

You are a professional who responds in a professional manner. You may have been in the workforce for a number of years or perhaps you are just starting out. Regardless of the level of experience you are coming with to the interview – you chose how you are perceived. You can raise the standard and win points with the interviewer. Never lower your expectation and never demonstrate anything but integrity, clarity and professional attitude. To achieve a better job for better pay and have a better life, commit to excellence.

-Charles

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 5, “Would You Relocate (or Travel)?”

P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 3

“Would You Rejoin Your Former Company?”

Before you read on, remember that these questions are not provided for you to merely skim over. The planning and preparation of answers is essential to maximizing your interviewing prowess. The only way to succeed is to match your background to a positive, upbeat, convincing answer for each of these questions. Start with your resume, know every word on it. Another key part of your preparation is company research. You should know as much about the company as you possibly can before you arrive for the interview.

Most people would say yes, but this question has a hidden agenda. The interviewer wants to be sure that you’ll stay on if you’re hired, so your response should be something like, “I really enjoyed the opportunity to work there – it’s a fine company, and they treated me very well, but it’s time to move my career along to the next level. That’s why I’m so interested in your firm. I’m considering opportunities at a number of excellent companies, but yours is at the top of my list.”

Always be alert to the question behind the question. If you responded the way that most would, with the yes response, you could have closed the door of opportunity with this company before you even got all the way through the interview. In contrast, when you prepare in advance with thought and preparation, you have a polished response that presents you as a professional and prospective team member they want to offer the best position to.

Never enter into an interview for a new position with a desperate attitude. You are a person of value and integrity that has much to offer. You come to the table with an understanding of your quality, experience, potential and character. When you communicate that, you raise your value in the view of the company.

-Charles

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 4, “What Stresses You?”

P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 2

 “Tell Me About Your Weaknesses.”

When you encounter this question you could reply: “I have trouble getting along with people” or “I have trouble meeting deadlines” or “My spouse can’t stand it if I work on weekends, and I don’t like having to deal with that.” Fine, you told the truth. What the employer will tell you know is good-bye. They may not speak it for another few minutes, but we guarantee that that response has just clicked on his mind. You’re history.

Keeping those three weaknesses for our mythical job hunter, let’s alter the response 180 degrees without really changing the basis of the answers.

Weakness                                          Why Not Respond…
Trouble getting along with people? “I do tend to get impatient with people 
                                                                  who are deliberately unproductive.”
Trouble meeting deadlines?              “Sometimes I feel so overloaded with
                                                                  electronic information, I have to be careful
                                                                  to prioritize my time.”
Angry spouse?                                       “Sometimes I have to be careful – I get
                                                                  so wrapped up in my work that I don’t
                                                                  give my family the time they need.”

All we are suggesting is that you insist in your mind that you’ll take a positive approach to every interviewing question. Work on it, practice, role-play and conduct post interview self-critiques. For the process of self-evaluation, use the technique we call the interviewing continuum to facilitate an ongoing analysis. Both during and after the interview, think of the discussion as generating positive, neutral or negative responses. On the interviewing continuum, one end is positive, the middle is neutral and the opposite end is negative. You can afford negative points on no questions if you plan to get the offer you really want.  You can get by with a few neutral responses. But the great majority must be positive. They must weigh the interviewing continuum to the positive if you are to leave the impression necessary to receive an excellent offer.

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 3, “Would you rejoin your former company?”
 
P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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The Toughest Job Interview Questions – Question 1

“Tell Me About Yourself?”

It is in response to this open-ended inquiry that many people talk themselves out of a job offer. But if you structure your answer as we suggest – starting at the bottom of page two on the resume and moving up to the top of page one with a two-minute biographical sketch of who you are, where you’ve been and where you’re going – you’ll succeed.

1. Start with your early history – where you were born, where you grew up. If you served in the armed forces, mention that here.

2. Part two is your education. Tell where you went to school and what degree you received.

3. Part three is professional experience – a brief description of your jobs since leaving school, explaining the transitions between jobs and notable accomplishments you achieved. Then quickly move to your most recent (or current) position, explaining how your skills, accomplishments and experience relate to the opening.

4. Finally, part four is a career plan – a brief explanation of why you and this company would be a good match, reflecting facts you learned in your advance research on the firm. In closing, mention what a first-rate company this is and that you are pleased to be interviewed for a position in the firm.

Quite simply, when you follow these four steps, you’ve transformed a major roadblock into a positive image of yourself in the employer’s eyes. And you’re a giant step closer to a job offer.

P.S. Don’t miss our next segment on Question 2, “Tell me about your weaknesses.”

P.P.S. Don’t miss our Radio Program – Better Job, Better Pay, Better Life!

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Go out and get busy!

Dale Carnegie, American writer and motivator, once said that, “If you want to conquer fear, don’t sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.” The simplicity and power of that statement is worth not just reflecting on but acting on.

If you are underemployed you know the frustration of settling for less when down deep you know you deserve more. More importantly you know inside that you are fully capable of more. Sadly too many people are settling for less. In the process of “settling” they have also nurtured a fear inside of them that has grown to epic proportion.

The fear that I am speaking of is the fear of change. When we become complacent and satisfied for less than we could and should be we do more than doubt we freeze in fear. We develop a fear of the change. We fear if we did step forward and try for a better position or to start a business that we would fail. We fear that if we spoke up that we would be ridiculed and laughed at. By who? Often we fear what others who are in the same trap would think.

Why fear the response or attitudes of people who have accepted the lie of failure or mediocrity? Why let others hold you back when you still have the glimmer of a dream inside you. Jim Carrey wisely said, “If you’ve got talent, protect it.” I believe you need to take that farther, if you have talent and a dream you need to nurture it, protect it and each day do something to advance it.

Don’t be afraid of succeeding, you might just do it. Start by doing something positive to fulfill your dream today. Let me ask you this question and I encourage you to respond to this post, if you knew that you would not fail what would you do instead of what you are doing now?

-Charles

Copyright 2012 © Dawson & Lyons Consulting, Inc  

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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